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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
that protects and enhances israel's security and regional stability and an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> does that mean a cease-fire is imminent? showdown over benghazi. top intelligence officials tell nbc news they knew from the beginning that benghazi was a terrorist act but kept susan rice's talking points deliberately vague. on capitol hill, 97 house republicans sent a letter to the president calling rice unfit to serve as secretary of state. they of course play no role in whether she gets the job. >>> plus the general's wife. an insider's perspective on the strains on military marriages. >>> celebrating the big 7-0. vice president gets a tweet from the boss, obama not springsteen. >> i'm andrea mitchell in washington. hillary clinton will land in israel within the next few hours and head directly to jerusalem to meet with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. the exchange of fire continued today from both sides. joining me now nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv and ayman mohyeldin in gaza. martin, to you, what are israelis sa
to israel, this is a house belonging to a senior official of hamas, but at the same time there were 12 people inside of that house, including four women and four children. all of them killed. so many people are condemning that attack. meanwhile, it is nighttime here and the people of gaza are bracing themselves for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two centra
. the text of the cease-fire reads in part, israel should stop all hostilities in the gaza strip, land, sea and erin colluding the targeting of individuals. israel is to commence, quote, opening the crossing and facilitating the movement of people and transfer of goods and targeting residents in border areas and implementation will be dealt with. that is why it is seen to loosen the restrictions. in other words, if it holds, and that is definitely a big if at this moment, it will represent a net benefit to the estimates 1.7 million people living in the gaza strip. for example, israel eased restrictions on fishermen in the waters around gaza, allowing them to go out twice as far as they could before the latest hostilities. organizations and members of the international community have been calling for the ease of these restrictions since first initiated in 2006. after pressure in 2007 and i gain in 2010. after firing roughly 1500 rockets at israel, the civilian centers and killing six people, hamas can turn around claiming their military tactics worked, they brought about a change in israel.
of the agreement reads in part, israel should stop all hostilities in the gaza strip land sea and air. no more operations like the one that killed jabari and israel is to commence quote opening the crossings and facilitating the movements of people and transfer of goods and procedures of implementation shall be dealt with after 24 hours from the start of the cease-fire. that is widely seen as a commitment to loosen the restrictions israeli has placed on all movements of people and goods in and out of gaza. if it holds, and that's a big if, it will represent a net benefit to the estimated 1.7 million people living in the gaza strip. for example, israel has already reportedly eased restrictions on fishermen in the waters around gaza, allowing them to go out twice as far as they could before the hostilities. human rights organizations have been calling for easing of the restrictions since the siege of gaza was initiated in 2006. and after international pressure in 2007 and 2010, reforms were made. after firing roughly 1500 rockets at israel at civilian centers and killing six people, hamas can tu
a free sample at eucerinus.com. >>> when a cease-fire between israel and gaza took effect today, it was 2:00 p.m. on the east coast of the united states, with a time difference that meant it was 9:00 p.m. in gaza. and this is how people there reacted. after eight straight days of very fierce fighting, very welcome news. today, when the fighting stopped, people poured into the streets of gaza, cheering. now, it was not a given that the cease-fire would happen today. not, especially, after a bomb exploded this morning on a bus in tel aviv in israel, injuring dozens of people. after that bombing, the rockets out of gaza into israel and the bombardment continued right up until the cease-fire was scheduled to go into effect. right up to the minute. i mean, the cease-fire was scheduled to go into effect at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, right? at least one israeli missile landed in gaza as 1:57 p.m. even after that, at 1:59 p.m., four rockets were launched into israel from gaza. but then a minute later, the cease-fire was due to take hold and it stopped. what was immediately noted, i think, particular
the gaza strip. >> israel will continue to take whatever action is necessary to defend our people. >> we'll talk to michael oren, israel's ambassador to the united states. >>> and president obama at this hour in staten island to hear from storm victims. >>> plus, say cheese. new members of congress pose for their class photo. perhaps the last time they'll look this happy. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in new york. as the nation learns about the key players and the controversy surrounding general david patreaus, successor at the cia on capitol hill briefing members of the house intelligence committee today. joining me now for our daily fix, chris cillizza managing editor of postpolitics.com, and kelly o'donnell and correspondent pete williams. pete, first to you. talk first about what is going on in the investigation? the fbi agent who was first only known as the person who triggered this, he was an acquaintance, friend of jill kelley's. we knew he had been taken off the case, was in fact the subject of an internal ethics review at the fbi and sent a photo without a shirt. now, th
supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. my message to all of them was that israel has every right to expect that it does not have missiles fired into its territory. if that can be accomplished without a ramping up of military activity in gaza, that's preferable. not just for the people of gaza, it's also preferable for israelis because if israeli troops are in gaza, they are much more at risk of incurring fatalities or being wounded. >> long simmering conflict between israel and gaza boiled over on wednesday after israel killed the top commander of hamas. since then, five straight days of air strikes and rocket barrages into israel. some rockets targeted tel aviv and jerusalem. whether both sides feel like they have accomplished whatever they felt like they needed to accomplish with this exchange of force. or alternatively, whether israel is going to roll these tanks that has massed on the border over that border for a big ground incursion into gaza. 75,000 military reservists have been mo
israel's right to defend itself. >> let's understand what the event here was that's causing the current crisis. that was an ever escalating number of missiles that were landing not just in israeli territory, but in areas that are populated. and, there's no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on thinker citizens. we are supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. we will continue to support israel's right to defend itself. now, what is also true is that we are actively working with all the parties in the region to see if we can end those missiles being fired without further escalation. >> the troops along the israel gaza border. israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu said they are going to expand the operation. the back and forth has been escalating since wednesday when they killed a chief. since then, israel carried out air strikes on targets in gaza. the death toll is at 56. hamas retaliated killing three civilians in a small town in southern israel thursday. netanyahu
happened on september 11 in libya. >>> major developments in the situation in israel and gaza where they could be on the brink of war. two rockets hitting southern tel aviv today. that was the sound they heard there. while no one was hurt it is the farthest gaza has ever hit inside israel. a brief cease-fire earlier in the day did not last long either. let's go to gaza live. >> reporter: good morning, richard. in fact, those sirens you're hearing on the israeli side, there aren't any of them here in gaza. in fact, israel has been carrying out air strikes all over the course of the past several hours. palestinians are reporting that there were casualties including a palestinian boy in the city. palestinian militants have been able to fire rockets into southern israel. there is no sign that the conflict on that front is actually slowing down. in fact, what many people here are questioning is the ability of the palestinians to be able to fire rockets so deep into israel raising questions about whether the israeli military operations so far have been successful. talking about a cease-fi
, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after it, a spokesman for hamas came out with a statement calling it a heroic attack. chris? >> stephanies go income tel aviv for us. thank you. i want to play for you something hillary clinton had to say yesterday. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> obviously, there's a lot at stake here for the people who live in the region, for the entire international community. but politically, i'm wondering what's at stake for hillary clinton and for this white house that seems to be approaching the middle east process differently than it did in the first term. >
know you've just listened to a white house briefing on two big stories. let's talk about israel first. >> reporter: well you're right. we did hear from senior white house officials. aboard air force one the president on his way to southeast asia for a historic trip there. but these activities are really unfolding in israel and the gaza strip is dominating attention worldwide. the president spoke again with the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. he has spoken with him each day before this crisis began to unfold. they talked about the iron dome program, the anti-rocket defense that is so far from what we can tell effectively protecting israel from those rocket strikes out of the gaza strip. the president has also spoken with the new egyptian president, mohammed mersi and turkish prime minister. they have relations with has mass according to the senior official they were encouraged to engage hamas to get them to stop the rocket strikes which the official characterized as the precipitating factor in this exchange of rocket fire from israel and hamas in the gaza strip. finally pros
>>> brokering peace with israeli troops still on the border this morning. leaders from israel and hamas sit down to negotiate phase two of the latest cease fire. we'll bring you live to the region. >>> plus, fiscal cliff diving. the countdown to the new year is counting down to economic disaster. what will it take to reach a compromise and pull the country back from the edge before january 1st. >>> the holiday season kicking into gear. we'll take you all around the country. meantime, relative calm between israel and gaza following the cease fire did not last very long. today a clash at the poirder left one palestinian dead and 15 wounded. as usual, we are hearing two different versions of this cease fire version. we have two reporters there. aman, i'll begin with you. what are they saying about the glash at the gaza border today? >> they're saying that the palestinians, 300 of them approached the israel/gaza border on the palestinian side of it. they went there to access their farm land. that area is considered mostly essentially farm land for those families. a lot of people e
in the middle east, the cease-fire between israel and hamas. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader, calm return. the people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence, and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> kristen is at the white house for us. happy thanksgiving to you. what are you hearing from the white house on this cease-fire? >> happy thanksgiving, alex. the white house is encouraged by this cease-fire, as you point out. it is a diplomatic success for president obama, for secretary of state hillary clinton. but they are also viewing this cease-fire very cautiously. they know it is fragile so they're keeping that in mind as they continue to monitor the situation. president obama spent part of his day yesterday reaching out to leaders in the region, thanking them for making this cease-fire possible. called egyptian president mahmoud morsi, and benjamin netanyahu. president obama reiterated the united states believes israel has t
between israel and hamas is a long and difficult history. would not be an overstatement to say it's among the most complicated the world has known. for context, we'll begin in 1947. the year the united nations passed its partition plan calling for the creation of separate arab and jewish states. fighting broke out between the two groups and israel declared independence in may 1948. the next day, israel was invaded by jordan, egypt, lebanon, syria and iraq. but the fledgling country survived. the u.n. passed resolution 194 in december 1948 which allowed ref are geez who wished to live peacefully the right to return home at the earliest practical date. nearly 20 years later in 1967, israel pre 'em tifl struck egyptian forces after the access was blocked to the port. israel gained control over areas including the west bank and gaza strip and east jerusalem. for arabs, this was the beginning of a period of occupation by israel which remains at the center of today's conflict. now, there would be another air rob israeli war in 1973. before that, there's the formation of the plo or the palestini
. happy thanksgiving. i'm alex witt. with latest from israel to the big parade in manhattan a packed morning for you. the balloons are filled, ready to go, talking about the 86th annual macy's thanksgiving day parade. live for you along the parade route. >>> the president is behind her, now u.n. ambassador susan rice defendinging her record to critics taking her to task on benghazi. will it be enough? >>> celebrations in gaza. so far, the day-old cease-fire is holding but the real work begins. and that fragile cease-fire between israel and hamas militants brokered by the u.s. government and egyptian president morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last
mind about the prospect of a war in the middle east as israel and palestinian militants get closer to the brink this weekend. israel expanding its air assault against hamas and palestinian militants continuing to fire rockets into civilian areas of southern israel. that's where i want to begin this morning. i've got nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell and "new york times" columnist tom friedman. who better to have to discuss this. tom, as the two sides get closer to the brink, based on your experience and reporting, where is this going? >> let's just go around the horn, david, quickly. i think hamas is trying to use this moment to both break out of the blockade and try to end targeted killing of its leaders from israel, and trying to take advantage of the new arab spring balance of power, the muslim brotherhood in egypt, to leverage that possibility. israel. israel has been watching for the last six to nine months hamas bringing in longer and longer range missiles from iran. i think they saw this as an opportunity of necessity to take those out, missiles that
must end. >> with america's role in negotiations stepping up the fighting, it's raging on. israel pound gag sa with round after round of air strikes today. at least 19 civilians were wounded in a bus bombing that took place in tel aviv. that blast happening as the bus was passing the defense ministry there. hamas leaders praised that bombing calling it a natural response to israeli massacres in gaza. in gaza, however, people took to the streets in celebration of that explosion in israel. the white house condemning the bus bombing, going on record saying that the u.s. will stand with its israeli allies. joining me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these pas
.s. says it won't help its bid to establish a palestinian stateside by side with israel. >> we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n. outside of the framework of negotiations to achieve a two-state solution because no matter what happens at the united nations, it will not produce the outcome that this government -- this president and certainly i strongly support. >> nbc's martin fletcher is live for us in tel aviv. martin, it's nothing new that israel ends up losing p.r. battles with the united nations. this is sort of what's happened over the years. this was a vote that was actually delayed almost a year -- the united states successfully delayed this vote for a long time. what's going to happen today? >> reporter: well, the united states tried to delay this vote, too, very strongly and also israel. what's going to happen today is they're going to lose. it's going to be a bit of a slap in the face for the united states after having tried to persuade the palestinian leader not to take this vote. the palestinians it seems will have an overwhelming support in the
mongs the people here. also in israel living under the direct threat of rocket fire. >> and there is the concern of how egypt will react. what is the word there on how they are reacting? >> well, we already heard from egypt's president and the foreign minister. they have condemned the emergency meeting in the arab league to explore popular options. egypt says it will open the border with gaza to completely allow all wounded and injured and anybody else who wants to get out. we are getting initial reports that the prime minister may be leading a high delegation visit tomorrow. that would be unprecedented given the security situation here. >> a ayman, thank you so much. appreciate it. from the middle east to back home. let's take a look at what is happening this hour. the president will land in new york city within the next 30 minutes, where he will tour the damage done by superstorm sandy. he will be greeted by andrew cuomo and governor bloomberg. and there are two closed door meetings on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. one is taking place with th
. >> it was all good till you said that, but whatever. the growing crisis between israel and the palestinians, we want to get to this story, gaza is on the verge of all-out war developing over the past 24 hours in response to repeated rocket attacks from hamas operatives. israel has begun mobilizing some 30,000 reserve troops including armored vehicles and tanks. overnight the fighting did not let up. explosions rocked gaza city as israeli warplanes pounded hamas targets. hamas vowing retaliation for the death of its military chief two days ago is escalating missile attacks deeper into israel. the jerusalem post reports that israeli air force has fired a rock near the home of hamas's prime minister. no one was reportedly injured. for the first time since the gulf war, more than 20 years ago, air raid sirens were triggered in the commercial capital of tel aviv, sending residents running for cover. so far the long-range missiles fired from gaza have landed without damage there. yesterday israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu warned that the military operation could significantly widen. >> no go
today besides that. today the u.s. and israel got outvoted 138-9 on a vote to grant palestinians sort of junior nation status at the u.n. palestine is not officially a country so they're not officially a member of the u.n. they officially get to be observers of what happens at the u.n. this was a symbolic stamp of international approval for the political legitimacy of the palestinians. it may not have much practical impact, but politically speaking, it was the u.s. and israel that were desperately trying to have this vote today not happen. so that we would not to be shown to be so isolated in the world in terms of our country's perspective and the israeli perspective on this issue. the u.s. knew that the vote would look this lopsided which is why we did not want the vote to happen, but it happened anyway and it happened just like we knew it would. now what? also on your plate, after president obama took his big historic trip to burma this month, the first time a u.s. president has ever visited burma, the burmese government today attacked their own people using what is being described
of a very scary flare-up between israel and gaza. we do not know exactly what started this most recent round of fighting, but we do know that an israeli air strike killed the top commander of hamas in gaza on wednesday, and we know then that that was followed by rocket attacks aimed at southern israel and then tel aviv, and then today jerusalem. israel has been pounding gaza with air strikes. the attacks appeared to be rapidly escalating including signs that israel is preparing for a ground incursion into gaza. "the new york times" citing reports of israeli tanks massing on the border with gaza. amid all of this in the world, today washington was consumed with two major issues. the first was the start of negotiations to head off a deliberate crisis that d.c. created for itself so they could come to a few new deal between the parties and between the president and congress on spending and taxes and the deficit. that negotiation started today. the white house said top level white house staffers will be continuing those negotiations that started today, even while the president is off on this big
in a bitter custody battle over 4-year-old nala. >>> the cease-fire between israel and hamas appears to be holding. tensions remain high in the region. as does the level of rhetoric coming from both sides of the border. stephanie gosk joins us live from tel aviv. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, veronica. our nbc news team on the ground in gaza is telling us that a 20-year-old man was shot and killed near the border this morning and ten others were wounded in a gun battle when they got too close to the israeli side. this could potentially cause problems for what is already a delicate cease-fire. and right now, there's not a lot of optimism on either side. >> children are finally playing outside again in southern israel but the city of eshcalon is not back to normal. ask 3-year-old donna. it's hard to forget rocket sirens. >> she won't leave my side, her mother says. every little noise sdairs her. grandmother alana isn't celebrating this cease-fire either. eight days of suffering for nothing, she told us. on tv, the people of gaza say that they want. ashcalon is an easy
comes in the midst of a flairup between israel and gaza. we don't know what started the most-recent round of fighting, but we do know a strike killed the top commander of hamas in gaza on wednesday and that was followed by rocket attacks aimed the israel and tel aviv. the attacks appeared to be rapidly escalating including sounds they are preparing for a ground incursion. israeli tanks massing on the border with gaza. amid-all of this in the world, today washington was consumed with two issues. the first was the start of negotiations to head off a deliberate crisis that d.c. created for itself so they could come to a few new deal between the parties and congress on spending and taxes and the deficit. that negotiation started today. the white house said top staffers will be continuing those negotiations that started today even while the president is off on this big historic trip to asia. the other thing consuming washington is the investigation into what happened in benghazi. in the midst of his sex scandal, but the head of the cia david petraeus testified to congress today ab
with satisfy the u.s. and israel that iran won't have a bomb and won't have the capability to break out to having one. so that's got to be resolved early in the new year or the u.s. warnings that unless this is resolved, all options are on the table will suddenly become very immediate, as will israel's threat to acting. that's the first thing on my list. i've got a bunch of others. i'd start -- >> let's take that one first. >> we'll stay with that one. richard haass, would you put that on the top of your list? >> for traditional foreign policy challenges, yes. what you want to do is smoke the iranians out. go out with an ambitious negotiating offer and learn one of two things. there is a possibility of an outcome we can live with, or we'll learn there's not, in which case we've got a degree of clarity and then we could face what could be an almost existential choice for us, whether we're prepared to live with an iranian nuclear weapon or something close to it or prepared to launch a military strike. >> do the iranians believe we're going to launch a military strike against them? >> give
island woke up without power. joining me now live on the phone is new york congressman steve israel whose district encompasses a large portion of island. what can you give us on the progress this morning? >> we've gone from a wind emergency and a flood emergency to a power emergency. as you just said, there are nearly 3/4 of 1 million long islanders who do not have power. long island power authority is making a slow and incremental progress. what concerns me at this point is last night for the first time since the storm, the temperatures dipped down into the 30s. so long islanders are experiencing very cold temperatures. if it continues, this becomes beyond a power emergency. it becomes a public health and safety emergency. one thing that the administration has done, which i'm grateful for, is they've deployed national forest service assets, chainsaws, woodchipers, and personnel, about 120 national forest service personnel to long island to help with tree removal and downed trees. >> it is pretty amazing when we think about this being november 1st. here we are talking about being in the t
, and overcontrolled by a centralized state that is growing like cudzu on a north georgia highway. >> israel should learn how? >> it's not enough to say you can't shoot your way to power, you've got to open up a diplomatic path. and will they open up a diplo t diplomatic path? and the question for the hamas group is will they accept israel? we don't know that. i would simply say that's now one of the half dozen fault lines out there in the middle east. you've got syria, the iranian nuclear thing, the constitutional struggle with an egypt. you potentially have jordan getting in the mix. plus you've now got the oldest of the issues, the israel israeli/palestinian issue. this is facing barack obama at a time he wants to do more in asia, deal with the fiscal cliff. welcome to your second term. >> a lot to do. richard haa ss. >> how did jerry adams do it? how did the irish terrorists as they were called before the peace deal, how did they not only enforce the peace but then turn to their own bad elements and say, step out of line, and we're going to crush you. >> one was, they couldn't shoot their way
-- do we talk about how much do we talk about benghazi, how much do we talk about israel. you know, that's what's hard about a press conference. you get your say at the start but the reporters ask their questions and you never know where the story goes from there. >> john harris, you've been in that room also as a former white house correspondent and the president is going to be going into this meeting with the business leaders asking for their advice, their terms of reference, how much to give on taxes and which are the most important from their perspective and potentially a little advice as well on what kind of leader they would like to see at the treasury. >> there's no question about it and i think that is the big issue, the fiscal cliff and all the choices that president obama has to make. the different positions he's going to be striking publicly, to set himself up well for private negotiations. clearly the petraeus story is the most sensational news of the day. i think that is the most significant. if i can make two points for the historically minded people on this panel to agree
israel launched an operation against militants in benghazi, killing hamas's military chief. as for the economy, the retail sales fell in october, first decline in three months. that's it from cnbc, first in business worldwide. now back to "hardball." >>> do you think photo i.d. would have made any difference? the outcome of this election? >> yes, i think so. we're looking at all sorts of different precincts and all sorts of same-day registrations. people will go on, we don't have fraud and abuse in our election, but why couldn't we have voter i.d. when majority of our people in wisconsin want it, the governor signed it. why should one judge be able to hold it up? >> there you have the problem with the republican party. pay a lot of attention to that what that woman just said, senate senator. that's the state -- state senator wisconsin, i don't know her, served as mitt romney's co-chair in the state and now she's saying suppressing the voter i.d. cards would have made the difference in wisconsin. let's look at the facts. apparently she's not interested in the fact. obama won
france is going along with the rest of the general assembly, the united states and israel and a few others will probably stand alone against this gesture considered a very important move by the sort of weakened fatah branch of the palestinians after what happened with gaza and hamas and susan rice has to represent the united states. and there's got to be a lot of weakening of her position. >> wow, a lot going on. obviously the fiscal cliff as well. the president is sitting down with a dozen chief executeties today to talk about this. some of them were prominent supporters of mitt romney. and then the president is going to try and sell his budget plan going to a toy factory. speaking of -- >> that's where i'd go. >> speaking of the budget, coming up, former treasurer secretary larry summers joins us on set and ray liotta and mark mckinnon and in a few minutes harold ford jr. up next the top stories in the political playbook with mike allen but first bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill. >> good morning, mika and everyone out here live rockefeller plaza. the world's failous
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)